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The Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington D.C. The bridge spans over a body of water and is connected to an area with many trees that have multicolored leaves. Shutterstock

Washington, D.C.’s 15 most important neoclassical structures, mapped

The White House, the Jefferson Memorial, the Commerce Department, the American Red Cross headquarters, and more—these creations typify the District’s most prominent architectural style 

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Tall columns, symmetrical shapes, triangular pediments, domed roofs—neoclassical features can be found anywhere and everywhere in the District.

Just the city plan demonstrates Washington's architectural style, with its consolidated scheme and central forum with city services.

To see just how far the Neoclassical style reaches, check out this map of the District’s 15 top examples, from memorials to museums to bridges.

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1. The Fessenden House

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3107 Fessenden Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

An heir to the Giant Food fortune built this Forest Hills single-family in 1994 to house his art collection. According to a 2015 listing, the building pays tribute to English architects James and Robert Adams. The Kuwaiti government bought it the following year for $18 million

2. 16th Street Bridge

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Piney Branch Parkway Northwest
Washington, DC

The 16th Street Bridge was the first parabolic arch bridge constructed in the U.S.

It spans 272 feet, and is made of reinforced concrete and steel with hollow spandrels between the arch and abutments. It's also known as the Piney Branch Bridge. Construction wrapped in 1910.

The 16th street bridge in Washington D.C. The bridge spans over a parkway.

3. Ashburton House

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1525 H Street NW
Washington, D.C.

The Ashburton House is also known as the St. John’s Church Parish House or British Legation.

Built in 1836, it served as a home for British diplomats, and was the site of 10 months of U.S.-British negotiations that eventually led to the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. It is currently used as offices and meeting space for St. John's Church.

The building has been heavily renovated, but still includes original details such as the six marble- and one wood-mantled fireplaces, four floor-length marble columns on the first floor, and lintels above the doors.

4. National Museum of Women in the Arts

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1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
(202) 783-5000
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The National Museum of Women in the Arts occupies the old Masonic Temple, a neoclassical building that is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

The museum’s collection includes more than 4,500 paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and decorative art.

The exterior of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The facade is yellow with columns. Shutterstock

5. The White House

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1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20500
(202) 456-1414
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Built in 1800, the White House might be the most well-known neoclassical building in America.

It was designed by architect James Hoban to resemble the Leinster House in Dublin. George Washington wasn't so keen on Hoban's Georgian-style submission, so he requested the development be widened and more ornamental.

In 1824, architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe added the portico to the building and is said to have been influenced by the Château de Rastignac, a country estate in France.

The exterior of the White House in Washington D.C. The building has columns flanking the entrance area. Shutterstock

6. U.S. Treasury

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1500 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20220

The Treasury Building was built in four phases from 1836 to 1869. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971, and serves as the headquarters for the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

It features a three-story-high ionic colonnade and a full entablature unbroken by a pediment.

The exterior of the United States treasury in Washington D.C. The facade has columns and a statue of a man in front. Shutterstock

7. U.S. General Services Administration

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1800 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20405

According to the GSA website, the GSA building was the first truly modern office building that the U.S. government constructed. It served as a model for federal offices through the early 1930s.

Built in 1917, it was the first federal building to use limestone facing. The building features an E-shaped plan allowing for open courtyards.

The exterior of the United States General Services Administration. The facade is white and there is a statue of an eagle on top of the entryway. Shutterstock

8. American Red Cross Headquarters

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431 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20006

The American Red Cross National Headquarters serves as both a memorial to the women who served in the Civil War and as the headquarters for the American Red Cross.

It's composed of white marble with a corinthian entrance portico and corinthian columns. The construction for this building ended in 1917, and it was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.

The exterior of the American Red Cross Headquarters in Washington D.C. The facade is white with columns. Shutterstock

9. The John Wilson Building

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1350 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20004
(202) 724-8080
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The building dates from 1908, and houses the offices and chambers of Washington’s mayor and City Council. Philadelphia firm Cope & Stewardson won a competition to design the structure. 

The exterior of the John Wilson Building in Washington D.C. The facade is white with multiple windows. Shutterstock

10. DAR Constitution Hall

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1776 D St NW
Washington, D.C. 20006
(202) 628-4780
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John Russell Pope designed this 1929 building. 

Housing D.C.’s largest auditorium and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985, the DAR Constitution Hall was originally built to host the Daughters of the American Revolution’s annual convention.

The exterior of the Daughters of the American Revolution’s building. The facade is white and there are columns flanking the entrance. Shutterstock

11. Herbert C. Hoover Building

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1401 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20230

The Commerce Department’s headquarters includes Indiana limestone walls, bronze doors, a Vermont marble base, and accent flooring. 

When built in 1932, it became the largest office building in the world with with more than 1.8 million square feet of floor area, forming almost the entire west side of the Federal Triangle from Constitution Avenue to E Street.

The exterior of the Herbert Hoover Building in Washington D.C.  The facade is tan with columns. Shutterstock

12. National Gallery of Art

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6th St and Constitution Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20565
(202) 737-4215
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Two buildings compose the National Gallery of Art: The West Building that John Russell Pope designed and the East Building that I.M. Pei designed. 

While Pei’s design is more modern, Pope’s design features all the characteristics of neoclassical architecture, including a symmetrical shape, tall columns, and a triangular pediment. 

Construction on the West Building wrapped in 1941.

The exterior of the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. There is a large staircase and columns on the front of the facade. Shutterstock

13. United States Capitol

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US Capitol
Washington, D.C. 20515
(202) 226-8000
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The Capitol was designed to resemble an ancient Roman temple, and construction would last from the 1790s well into the 20th century as the federal government expanded the complex and added its famed dome. 

The exterior of the United States Capitol building. The facade is white with a domed roof and columns. Shutterstock

14. Arlington Memorial Bridge

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Memorial Dr.
Washington, D.C. 20037

Built in 1932, the Arlington Memorial Bridge is a stone arch bridge composed of masonry, steel, and a central bascule that crosses the Potomac River.

It spans 2,163 feet, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

The Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington D.C. The bridge spans over a body of water and is connected to an area with many trees that have multicolored leaves. Shutterstock

15. Jefferson Memorial

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900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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Designed by architect John Russell Pope, the memorial features circular marble steps, a portico, a circular colonnade of ionic order columns, and a shallow dome.

To build the memorial, Pope made references to the Roman Pantheon and Jefferson’s own design for the University of Virginia’s rotunda. Construction wrapped in 1943.

The interior of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C. The roof is domed and there is a statue of a man in the center of the room. Shutterstock

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1. The Fessenden House

3107 Fessenden Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20008

An heir to the Giant Food fortune built this Forest Hills single-family in 1994 to house his art collection. According to a 2015 listing, the building pays tribute to English architects James and Robert Adams. The Kuwaiti government bought it the following year for $18 million

3107 Fessenden Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

2. 16th Street Bridge

Piney Branch Parkway Northwest, Washington, DC
The 16th street bridge in Washington D.C. The bridge spans over a parkway.

The 16th Street Bridge was the first parabolic arch bridge constructed in the U.S.

It spans 272 feet, and is made of reinforced concrete and steel with hollow spandrels between the arch and abutments. It's also known as the Piney Branch Bridge. Construction wrapped in 1910.

Piney Branch Parkway Northwest
Washington, DC

3. Ashburton House

1525 H Street NW, Washington, D.C.

The Ashburton House is also known as the St. John’s Church Parish House or British Legation.

Built in 1836, it served as a home for British diplomats, and was the site of 10 months of U.S.-British negotiations that eventually led to the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. It is currently used as offices and meeting space for St. John's Church.

The building has been heavily renovated, but still includes original details such as the six marble- and one wood-mantled fireplaces, four floor-length marble columns on the first floor, and lintels above the doors.

1525 H Street NW
Washington, D.C.

4. National Museum of Women in the Arts

1250 New York Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20005
The exterior of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The facade is yellow with columns. Shutterstock

The National Museum of Women in the Arts occupies the old Masonic Temple, a neoclassical building that is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

The museum’s collection includes more than 4,500 paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and decorative art.

1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20005

5. The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20500
The exterior of the White House in Washington D.C. The building has columns flanking the entrance area. Shutterstock

Built in 1800, the White House might be the most well-known neoclassical building in America.

It was designed by architect James Hoban to resemble the Leinster House in Dublin. George Washington wasn't so keen on Hoban's Georgian-style submission, so he requested the development be widened and more ornamental.

In 1824, architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe added the portico to the building and is said to have been influenced by the Château de Rastignac, a country estate in France.

1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20500

6. U.S. Treasury

1500 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20220
The exterior of the United States treasury in Washington D.C. The facade has columns and a statue of a man in front. Shutterstock

The Treasury Building was built in four phases from 1836 to 1869. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1971, and serves as the headquarters for the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

It features a three-story-high ionic colonnade and a full entablature unbroken by a pediment.

1500 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20220

7. U.S. General Services Administration

1800 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20405
The exterior of the United States General Services Administration. The facade is white and there is a statue of an eagle on top of the entryway. Shutterstock

According to the GSA website, the GSA building was the first truly modern office building that the U.S. government constructed. It served as a model for federal offices through the early 1930s.

Built in 1917, it was the first federal building to use limestone facing. The building features an E-shaped plan allowing for open courtyards.

1800 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20405

8. American Red Cross Headquarters

431 18th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006
The exterior of the American Red Cross Headquarters in Washington D.C. The facade is white with columns. Shutterstock

The American Red Cross National Headquarters serves as both a memorial to the women who served in the Civil War and as the headquarters for the American Red Cross.

It's composed of white marble with a corinthian entrance portico and corinthian columns. The construction for this building ended in 1917, and it was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.

431 18th St NW
Washington, D.C. 20006

9. The John Wilson Building

1350 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
The exterior of the John Wilson Building in Washington D.C. The facade is white with multiple windows. Shutterstock

The building dates from 1908, and houses the offices and chambers of Washington’s mayor and City Council. Philadelphia firm Cope & Stewardson won a competition to design the structure. 

1350 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20004

10. DAR Constitution Hall

1776 D St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006
The exterior of the Daughters of the American Revolution’s building. The facade is white and there are columns flanking the entrance. Shutterstock

John Russell Pope designed this 1929 building. 

Housing D.C.’s largest auditorium and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985, the DAR Constitution Hall was originally built to host the Daughters of the American Revolution’s annual convention.

1776 D St NW
Washington, D.C. 20006

11. Herbert C. Hoover Building

1401 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20230
The exterior of the Herbert Hoover Building in Washington D.C.  The facade is tan with columns. Shutterstock

The Commerce Department’s headquarters includes Indiana limestone walls, bronze doors, a Vermont marble base, and accent flooring. 

When built in 1932, it became the largest office building in the world with with more than 1.8 million square feet of floor area, forming almost the entire west side of the Federal Triangle from Constitution Avenue to E Street.

1401 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20230

12. National Gallery of Art

6th St and Constitution Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20565
The exterior of the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. There is a large staircase and columns on the front of the facade. Shutterstock

Two buildings compose the National Gallery of Art: The West Building that John Russell Pope designed and the East Building that I.M. Pei designed. 

While Pei’s design is more modern, Pope’s design features all the characteristics of neoclassical architecture, including a symmetrical shape, tall columns, and a triangular pediment. 

Construction on the West Building wrapped in 1941.

6th St and Constitution Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20565

13. United States Capitol

US Capitol, Washington, D.C. 20515
The exterior of the United States Capitol building. The facade is white with a domed roof and columns. Shutterstock

The Capitol was designed to resemble an ancient Roman temple, and construction would last from the 1790s well into the 20th century as the federal government expanded the complex and added its famed dome. 

US Capitol
Washington, D.C. 20515

14. Arlington Memorial Bridge

Memorial Dr., Washington, D.C. 20037
The Arlington Memorial Bridge in Washington D.C. The bridge spans over a body of water and is connected to an area with many trees that have multicolored leaves. Shutterstock

Built in 1932, the Arlington Memorial Bridge is a stone arch bridge composed of masonry, steel, and a central bascule that crosses the Potomac River.

It spans 2,163 feet, and was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Memorial Dr.
Washington, D.C. 20037

15. Jefferson Memorial

900 Ohio Dr SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
The interior of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington D.C. The roof is domed and there is a statue of a man in the center of the room. Shutterstock

Designed by architect John Russell Pope, the memorial features circular marble steps, a portico, a circular colonnade of ionic order columns, and a shallow dome.

To build the memorial, Pope made references to the Roman Pantheon and Jefferson’s own design for the University of Virginia’s rotunda. Construction wrapped in 1943.

900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024