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Take Our Eight Point Architectural Walking Tour of Georgetown

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[Photo by Flickr user ehpien]

Putting together an architectural walking tour of Georgetown is almost redundant. As Dan Malouff of Greater Greater Washington and Beyond D.C. notes, "Georgetown's strength is its overall vernacular, not any individual building(s)." That is to say, an architectural walking tour of Georgetown could just as easily be a stroll through over the cobblestones down M Street and taking in the ambience of a neighborhood that is very unique within the District. However, there are a few buildings that stand out within this historic 'hood so we've put together this eight point architectural walking tour of Georgetown together for your gazing pleasure. Enjoy and if you think we should add a point to the map, let us know in the comments or tip us.


· [Official Site]
· About Georgetown [Georgetown BID]
· Take A Ten Point Architectural Walking Tour of Dupont Circle [CDC]
· D.C.'s Haunted (and Otherwise Scary as Hell) Locations [CDC]

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1. House of Sweden

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2900 K St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007

The House of Sweden holds both the Embassy of Sweden and the Embassy of Iceland and we regrettably left it off of our map of architecturally exciting embassies. But not only does it have a great view of the water, but this contemporary building from Gert Wingårdh and Tomas Hansen is stunning on its own. Photo by Adam Fagen.

2. Whitehurst Freeway

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US 29
Washington, DC 20037

This one came as a recommendation, and honestly, if a fountain was a part of the Dupont Walking Tour than this piece of urban architecture is worth adding here. The way the bridge rises above the ground is interesting but more importantly walking underneath the freeway along the waterfront is an experience in and of itself. Photo by Flickr user thisisbossi.

3. Old Stone House

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3051 M St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007
(202) 895-6070
Visit Website

This pre-Revolutionary War home that stands as an homage to how everyday people lived is the oldest building in D.C. and is operate by the National Park Service. It's also one of D.C.'s most haunted locales. Photo by Wally Gobetz.

4. D.C.'s Narrowest Home

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2726 P Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20007

At nine feet wide (and that's the outside!) this skinny home owned by John West is not only D.C.'s narrowest home, but one of D.C.'s most photographed homes. Whether or not this was built as a spite house is still up for debate. Photo by R. Lopez.

5. Dumbarton House

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2715 Q St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007
(202) 337-2288
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This historic landmark, which also functions as a museum, could be its own day long trip. This Federalist house built around the turn of the 19th century has an impressive period art collection as well. Photo by Bill Rand.

6. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden

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1644 31st St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007
(202) 965-0400
Visit Website

Although Tudor Place is just as well known for the impressive gardens, this early 19th century Federalist home is impressive in its own right, and not just because Martha Washington's granddaughter was responsible for the construction. Photo by Flickr users Jean & Oliver.

7. Healy Hall, Georgetown University

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3700 O St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20057

There's a lot of great architecture on this Jesuit University's campus, but Gothic Healy Hall, designed by Paul J. Pelz in 1877 is clearly the most notable building on campus. It's also one of two places on campus that are considered historic landmarks. Photo by Flickr user ehpien.

8. The Exorcist Steps

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3600 Prospect St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007
(202) 789-7000
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The adjacent house on Prospect Street is also a good place to note due to the Hollywood factor, but really, the terrifying stone stairs (once called the Hitchcock stairs) are more important here. Just see if they don't give you chills. Photo by Luis Milla.

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1. House of Sweden

2900 K St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20007

The House of Sweden holds both the Embassy of Sweden and the Embassy of Iceland and we regrettably left it off of our map of architecturally exciting embassies. But not only does it have a great view of the water, but this contemporary building from Gert Wingårdh and Tomas Hansen is stunning on its own. Photo by Adam Fagen.

2900 K St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007

2. Whitehurst Freeway

US 29, Washington, DC 20037

This one came as a recommendation, and honestly, if a fountain was a part of the Dupont Walking Tour than this piece of urban architecture is worth adding here. The way the bridge rises above the ground is interesting but more importantly walking underneath the freeway along the waterfront is an experience in and of itself. Photo by Flickr user thisisbossi.

US 29
Washington, DC 20037

3. Old Stone House

3051 M St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20007

This pre-Revolutionary War home that stands as an homage to how everyday people lived is the oldest building in D.C. and is operate by the National Park Service. It's also one of D.C.'s most haunted locales. Photo by Wally Gobetz.

3051 M St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007

4. D.C.'s Narrowest Home

2726 P Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20007

At nine feet wide (and that's the outside!) this skinny home owned by John West is not only D.C.'s narrowest home, but one of D.C.'s most photographed homes. Whether or not this was built as a spite house is still up for debate. Photo by R. Lopez.

2726 P Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20007

5. Dumbarton House

2715 Q St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20007

This historic landmark, which also functions as a museum, could be its own day long trip. This Federalist house built around the turn of the 19th century has an impressive period art collection as well. Photo by Bill Rand.

2715 Q St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007

6. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden

1644 31st St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20007

Although Tudor Place is just as well known for the impressive gardens, this early 19th century Federalist home is impressive in its own right, and not just because Martha Washington's granddaughter was responsible for the construction. Photo by Flickr users Jean & Oliver.

1644 31st St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007

7. Healy Hall, Georgetown University

3700 O St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20057

There's a lot of great architecture on this Jesuit University's campus, but Gothic Healy Hall, designed by Paul J. Pelz in 1877 is clearly the most notable building on campus. It's also one of two places on campus that are considered historic landmarks. Photo by Flickr user ehpien.

3700 O St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20057

8. The Exorcist Steps

3600 Prospect St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20007

The adjacent house on Prospect Street is also a good place to note due to the Hollywood factor, but really, the terrifying stone stairs (once called the Hitchcock stairs) are more important here. Just see if they don't give you chills. Photo by Luis Milla.

3600 Prospect St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20007