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Take A Ten Point Architectural Walking Tour of Dupont Circle

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[Photo by Ron Cogswell]

Over the winter, Curbed asked you, the readers to pick the neighborhood that has the most exciting architecture. Although several neighborhoods had their fair share of supporters, Dupont Circle decidedly came out on top. Now that the weather is nicer, Curbed has put together an architectural walking tour of the famous neighborhood that locals ought to enjoy as much as tourists. Admit it, it's been awhile since you've been through Embassy Row and taken a second to look up and enjoy the view. Don't see one of your favorites on the map below? Let us know in the comment section.


· Thomas T. Gaff House [Wikipedia]
· Townsend House (Washington, D.C.) [Wikipedia]
· Christian Heurich Mansion [Wikipedia]
· St. Matthew's Cathedral [Official Site]
· Embassy of Indonesia (Washington D.C.) [Wikipedia]
· The Mansion on O Street [Wikipedia]
· Dupont Circle [Wikipedia]
· Dupont Circle Fountain [Wikipedia]
· The Phillips Collection [Wikipedia]
· L. Ron Hubbard House [Wikipedia]
· All Coverage of The Patterson Mansion [CDC]

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1. Cathedral of Saint Matthew the Apostle

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1725 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036
(202) 347-3215
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The southernmost point on this walking tour includes an impressive dome. That said, the interior is equally stunning and deserves a look see. Architect Christopher Grant LaFarge started work on the cathedral in 1893. Photo by Ron Cogswell.

2. Heurich Mansion (The Brewmaster's Castle)

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1307 New Hampshire Ave, NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036
(202) 429-1894
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This impressive castle and standout building off the Circle was designed for the German brewmaster by John Granville Meyers at the end of the 19th century. It still holds events and the garden is rather impressive as well. Photo by Mr. T in DC.

3. The Mansion on O Street

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2020 O St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036
(202) 496-2020
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The Mansion on O Street was actually originally adjoining row houses designed by architect Edward Clark for himself and his family. Now, it's a boutique hotel used for private events. Moreover, look at those lions guarding the home! Photo by Jen Young.

4. Dupont Circle Fountain (Samuel Francis Du Pont Memorial Fountain)

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in Dupont Circle Park
Washington DC, D.C. 20036

Just because it's not a building and it's technically more public art than architecture, doesn't mean it can't be included. Perhaps D.C.'s most famous fountain was constructed by Daniel Chester French for the DuPont family. Photo by Victoria Pickering.

5. The Patterson Mansion

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15 Dupont Circle Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

This is the building that's probably made the most headlines within the past year. Once the home of newspaper heiress Cissy Patterson, the mansion was placed on the market by the Washington Club for $26 million. The attempt to turn it into a boutique hotel has been foiled, so the current plan is to turn the building into micro-units. Photo by Elvert Barnes.

6. Embassy of Indonesia

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2020 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036-1083
(202) 775-5200

This home of the Indonesian Embassy is also called the Walsh-McLean House. Thomas Walsh commissioned architect Henry Andersen to design the fifty room mansion for his daughter, Evalyn Walsh-McLean. She was also the last private owner of The Hope Diamond. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

7. Thomas T. Gaff House

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1520 20th Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

This home was designed at the turn of hte last century by famed architect Jules Henri de Sibour for the wealthy businessman Gaff. Currently, the Colombian ambassador to the United States lives in this historic mansion. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

8. The Phillips Collection

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1600 21st St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20009
(202) 387-2151
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The Georgian Revival house has showcased visual art dating back to the turn of the century, but the building has expanded first in 1960, then in 2006, to hold the ever growing collections. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

9. Cosmos Club

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2121 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20008

This Beaux Arts home was designed in 1898 by Carrère and Hastings. Also referred to as the Townsend house after its first owner, it's been home to the exclusive Cosmos Club since the 1950s. Photo by Mr. T in DC

10. L. Ron Hubbard Original Church

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1812 19th St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20009

Believe it or not, the religion adopted by several Hollywood greats started north of Dupont Circle. Although the current location of the Church of Scientology (and all of the related protests) is elsewhere, this served as Hubbard's home in the 1950s. Regardless of what you think of Hubbard, the Mediterranean Revival home is rather impressive. Photo by Joe Loong.

1. Cathedral of Saint Matthew the Apostle

1725 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20036

The southernmost point on this walking tour includes an impressive dome. That said, the interior is equally stunning and deserves a look see. Architect Christopher Grant LaFarge started work on the cathedral in 1893. Photo by Ron Cogswell.

1725 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036

2. Heurich Mansion (The Brewmaster's Castle)

1307 New Hampshire Ave, NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20036

This impressive castle and standout building off the Circle was designed for the German brewmaster by John Granville Meyers at the end of the 19th century. It still holds events and the garden is rather impressive as well. Photo by Mr. T in DC.

1307 New Hampshire Ave, NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036

3. The Mansion on O Street

2020 O St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20036

The Mansion on O Street was actually originally adjoining row houses designed by architect Edward Clark for himself and his family. Now, it's a boutique hotel used for private events. Moreover, look at those lions guarding the home! Photo by Jen Young.

2020 O St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036

4. Dupont Circle Fountain (Samuel Francis Du Pont Memorial Fountain)

in Dupont Circle Park, Washington DC, D.C. 20036

Just because it's not a building and it's technically more public art than architecture, doesn't mean it can't be included. Perhaps D.C.'s most famous fountain was constructed by Daniel Chester French for the DuPont family. Photo by Victoria Pickering.

in Dupont Circle Park
Washington DC, D.C. 20036

5. The Patterson Mansion

15 Dupont Circle Northwest, Washington, DC 20036

This is the building that's probably made the most headlines within the past year. Once the home of newspaper heiress Cissy Patterson, the mansion was placed on the market by the Washington Club for $26 million. The attempt to turn it into a boutique hotel has been foiled, so the current plan is to turn the building into micro-units. Photo by Elvert Barnes.

15 Dupont Circle Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

6. Embassy of Indonesia

2020 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20036-1083

This home of the Indonesian Embassy is also called the Walsh-McLean House. Thomas Walsh commissioned architect Henry Andersen to design the fifty room mansion for his daughter, Evalyn Walsh-McLean. She was also the last private owner of The Hope Diamond. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

2020 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20036-1083

7. Thomas T. Gaff House

1520 20th Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20036

This home was designed at the turn of hte last century by famed architect Jules Henri de Sibour for the wealthy businessman Gaff. Currently, the Colombian ambassador to the United States lives in this historic mansion. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

1520 20th Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

8. The Phillips Collection

1600 21st St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20009

The Georgian Revival house has showcased visual art dating back to the turn of the century, but the building has expanded first in 1960, then in 2006, to hold the ever growing collections. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

1600 21st St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20009

9. Cosmos Club

2121 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20008

This Beaux Arts home was designed in 1898 by Carrère and Hastings. Also referred to as the Townsend house after its first owner, it's been home to the exclusive Cosmos Club since the 1950s. Photo by Mr. T in DC

2121 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20008

10. L. Ron Hubbard Original Church

1812 19th St NW, Washington DC, D.C. 20009

Believe it or not, the religion adopted by several Hollywood greats started north of Dupont Circle. Although the current location of the Church of Scientology (and all of the related protests) is elsewhere, this served as Hubbard's home in the 1950s. Regardless of what you think of Hubbard, the Mediterranean Revival home is rather impressive. Photo by Joe Loong.

1812 19th St NW
Washington DC, D.C. 20009