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From Joan of Arc to Eleanor Roosevelt: Female Statues Mapped

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Yes, there's a statue of a dude on a horse in nearly every traffic circle in D.C. — and lots of images of old presidents, admirals and male muckety-mucks around town. But the city also boasts a sorority of statues of women, if only you know where to look. After the jump, a map of some of our favorite gals, let us know if we missed a few. -Jenn Barger


· Updated Guide to the Secret Memorials of DC [Curbed DC]
· The Franciscan Monastery: Finding Inner Peace in NE [Curbed DC]

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1. Eleanor Roosevelt - FDR Memorial

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900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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A life-size Eleanor Roosevelt, looking downright glowing in bronze, stands in front a symbol of the UN at the sprawling memorial dedicated to her husband. Photo by Flickr user Joel Kramer

2. Joan of Arc - Meridian Hill Park

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Meridian Hill Park
Washington, D.C.

Non, the 13th-century French vision-haver never visited D.C. This 1922 statue was erected to salute Gallic-American friendship. She's got a boss-looking sword, too, which was missing for years and was only recently replaced. Photo by Flickr user Ian Duncan

3. St. Bernadette - Franciscan Monastary

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1400 Quincy St NE
Washington, D.C. 20017
(202) 526-6800
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Nineteenth-century French nun Bernadette Soubirous, aka. St. Bernadette, saw visions at the Grotto of Lourdes. Now, you can see her pious-looking form kneeling in the garden of the Franciscan Monastery. Photo by Flickr user Siena Photo

4. Nymphs of Dupont Circle Fountain

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1 DuPont Cir NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

Naked nymphs don't seem like the usual way to commemorate a Civil War hero (Admiral Samuel Dupont). But these lovelies are meant to symbolize Sea and Stars, and they get to frolic with a naked male pal, Wind.

5. Vietnam Women's Memorial

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Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20242

Glenna Goodacre created a heartbreaking bronze showing a nurse comforting a dying soldier. Photo by Flickr user Wally Gobetz

6. Serenity - Meridian Hill Park

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Meridian Hill Park
Washington, D.C. 20009

Created by Spanish sculptor José Clara in 1925, this rather zaftig form was meant to symbolize, duh, a zen-like being. Serenity has suffered some abuse over the years — a broken nose, an amputated hand. Yet, true to her name, she still looks chill. Photo by Flickr user Rachel Patterson

7. Bartholdi Fountain Babes

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100 1st Ave
Washington, D.C. 20319
(202) 225-8333

The sculpted beings holding up this ornate fountain are known as tritons, but they look like badass Victorian bodybuilding women to us. The two-level confection, created by Frédéric August Bartholdi in 1876, sits in a verdant park just off the National Mall. Photo by Flickr user Clif

8. Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial

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East Capitol St
Washington, D.C. 20002

Known for starting a private school for African-American students, the civil rights leader is commemorated with a bronze statue showing her with — who else? — cute children. Photo by Flickr user Jonathon Colman

9. Guglielmo Marconi Memorial

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16th Street Northwest & Lamont Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20010

In a tiny Mount Pleasant park, a bare-breasted, golden 1941 Art Deco maiden created by Attilio Piccirilli seems to surf over a bust of radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi. Photo by Flickr user Adam Fagan

10. Founders of the DAR

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1776 D Street
Washington, D.C.

This 1929 marble sculpture by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney pays tribute to the founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Check out her sleek, late-flapper outfit! Photo by Flickr user Josh

11. Daguerre Memorial

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800 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20004
(202) 633-8300
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An 1890 salute in bronze by Jonathan Scott Hartley, this memorial honors French photography pioneer Louis Daguerre. Who is that woman? Who knows, but she's awfully attractive, in a Gibson Girl way. Photo by Flickr user Wall Gobetz

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1. Eleanor Roosevelt - FDR Memorial

900 Ohio Dr SW, Washington, D.C. 20024

A life-size Eleanor Roosevelt, looking downright glowing in bronze, stands in front a symbol of the UN at the sprawling memorial dedicated to her husband. Photo by Flickr user Joel Kramer

900 Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024

2. Joan of Arc - Meridian Hill Park

Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C.

Non, the 13th-century French vision-haver never visited D.C. This 1922 statue was erected to salute Gallic-American friendship. She's got a boss-looking sword, too, which was missing for years and was only recently replaced. Photo by Flickr user Ian Duncan

Meridian Hill Park
Washington, D.C.

3. St. Bernadette - Franciscan Monastary

1400 Quincy St NE, Washington, D.C. 20017

Nineteenth-century French nun Bernadette Soubirous, aka. St. Bernadette, saw visions at the Grotto of Lourdes. Now, you can see her pious-looking form kneeling in the garden of the Franciscan Monastery. Photo by Flickr user Siena Photo

1400 Quincy St NE
Washington, D.C. 20017

4. Nymphs of Dupont Circle Fountain

1 DuPont Cir NW, Washington, D.C. 20036

Naked nymphs don't seem like the usual way to commemorate a Civil War hero (Admiral Samuel Dupont). But these lovelies are meant to symbolize Sea and Stars, and they get to frolic with a naked male pal, Wind.

1 DuPont Cir NW
Washington, D.C. 20036

5. Vietnam Women's Memorial

Ohio Dr SW, Washington, D.C. 20242

Glenna Goodacre created a heartbreaking bronze showing a nurse comforting a dying soldier. Photo by Flickr user Wally Gobetz

Ohio Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20242

6. Serenity - Meridian Hill Park

Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C. 20009

Created by Spanish sculptor José Clara in 1925, this rather zaftig form was meant to symbolize, duh, a zen-like being. Serenity has suffered some abuse over the years — a broken nose, an amputated hand. Yet, true to her name, she still looks chill. Photo by Flickr user Rachel Patterson

Meridian Hill Park
Washington, D.C. 20009

7. Bartholdi Fountain Babes

100 1st Ave, Washington, D.C. 20319

The sculpted beings holding up this ornate fountain are known as tritons, but they look like badass Victorian bodybuilding women to us. The two-level confection, created by Frédéric August Bartholdi in 1876, sits in a verdant park just off the National Mall. Photo by Flickr user Clif

100 1st Ave
Washington, D.C. 20319

8. Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial

East Capitol St, Washington, D.C. 20002

Known for starting a private school for African-American students, the civil rights leader is commemorated with a bronze statue showing her with — who else? — cute children. Photo by Flickr user Jonathon Colman

East Capitol St
Washington, D.C. 20002

9. Guglielmo Marconi Memorial

16th Street Northwest & Lamont Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20010

In a tiny Mount Pleasant park, a bare-breasted, golden 1941 Art Deco maiden created by Attilio Piccirilli seems to surf over a bust of radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi. Photo by Flickr user Adam Fagan

16th Street Northwest & Lamont Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20010

10. Founders of the DAR

1776 D Street, Washington, D.C.

This 1929 marble sculpture by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney pays tribute to the founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Check out her sleek, late-flapper outfit! Photo by Flickr user Josh

1776 D Street
Washington, D.C.

11. Daguerre Memorial

800 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20004

An 1890 salute in bronze by Jonathan Scott Hartley, this memorial honors French photography pioneer Louis Daguerre. Who is that woman? Who knows, but she's awfully attractive, in a Gibson Girl way. Photo by Flickr user Wall Gobetz

800 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20004