clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Ten More Great Views in Washington D.C.

View as Map

[Photo by Kalyan Neelamraju]

Late last fall, Curbed took a look at some of the spots where residents and visitors can get great views of the city. Amongst the nine highlighted spots were a few public and well-known towers and rooftops (like the Washington National Cathedral and the Kennedy Center) and a few more private vantage points (like Rhapsody Condominiums which recently played host to this lovely snowy view). However, you, the readers pointed out a few fantastic vantage points that were absent from the original list. As such, here is a new map of ten more excellent views throughout the District.


· The Cairo [Wikipedia]
· The Awakening (sculpture) [Wikipedia]
· Fort Lincoln Park [The Cultural Landscape Foundation]
· The Nine Best Views in Washington D.C. [CDC]

Read More

The Cairo

Copy Link

D.C.'s tallest residential building at 164 square feet is quite the imposing structure. Plus, as the city's tallest apartment building, of course the views from the Dupont rooftop are magnificent, showing views through to the Potomac River. This building, constructed in 1894 was also what inspired the now-infamous Height Act of 1910, capping the city's building heights. Photo by Kalyan Neelamraju

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Copy Link

While it may seem hard to believe that such breathtaking views can come from a two story home, the vantage point from this Anacostia landmark across the river is impressive. Photo by Ted Eytan.

Old Post Office Pavilion

Copy Link

The Trumps probably already know this, but the view from the Old Post Office's clock tower gives an impressive look down Pennsylvania Avenue. This was another of these tall buildings constructed before the enactment of the Height Act. Photo by Bill Rogers.

Hains Point

Copy Link

Runners, cyclists and cherry blossom enthusiasts know that Hains Point provides great views across the Potomac into Virginia and Southeast D.C. Even though massive sculpture "The Awakening" has since moved to a new home in Maryland, Hains Point is worth the trip for seeing sunsets like this. Photo by Amarit Opassetthakul .

Dorchester House

Copy Link

The Dorchester House and the nearby Camden Roosevelt are both in that enviable area near Meridian Hill Park on 16th Street that give an enviable view of downtown just before the road dips into a downward slope. Photo by Angel Preble.

Fort Lincoln Park

Copy Link

The topmost points in this park in Northeast D.C. provide a unique view of the rest of the city. The park was also one of the city's ramparts used during the civil war, which makes sense as it's on a ridge. Photo by Courtney Spearman of the Cultural Landscape Foundation.

Harbour Square

Copy Link

This view from the Harbour Square co-op in Southwest D.C. is close to the Washington Channel and has an excellent view of the Harbour. Also, as one tipster pointed out, when the fireworks go off at nearby Nationals Stadium, there's a good view of those as well. Photo by E.L. Malvaney.

Sky House

Copy Link

If you're going to call the building Sky House, for Pete's sake, there had better be stunning views. This new residential building by the Waterfront definitely delivers. Not only is it possible to see those views of the National Mall and Northern Virginia from the rooftop, but during the summer it's possible to gaze out from within the building's rooftop swimming pool. Photo by Gerry Suchy.

Kennedy Row

Copy Link

From its spot near RFK Stadium, Kennedy Row provides a great view of the tree-covered homes of Capitol Hill and the land east of the Armory. Sunglasses are a must for this view, even if you do prefer to gaze at the city from a couch in a shadier spot. Photo by Valerie Paschall.

Capella Washington D.C.

Copy Link

One of D.C.'s newest hotels offers a stunning view as it's directly on the C&O Canal. What's more, guests can gaze over the canal from either the cozy rooftop lounge (shown here) or their rooftop pool.

Loading comments...

The Cairo

D.C.'s tallest residential building at 164 square feet is quite the imposing structure. Plus, as the city's tallest apartment building, of course the views from the Dupont rooftop are magnificent, showing views through to the Potomac River. This building, constructed in 1894 was also what inspired the now-infamous Height Act of 1910, capping the city's building heights. Photo by Kalyan Neelamraju

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

While it may seem hard to believe that such breathtaking views can come from a two story home, the vantage point from this Anacostia landmark across the river is impressive. Photo by Ted Eytan.

Old Post Office Pavilion

The Trumps probably already know this, but the view from the Old Post Office's clock tower gives an impressive look down Pennsylvania Avenue. This was another of these tall buildings constructed before the enactment of the Height Act. Photo by Bill Rogers.

Hains Point

Runners, cyclists and cherry blossom enthusiasts know that Hains Point provides great views across the Potomac into Virginia and Southeast D.C. Even though massive sculpture "The Awakening" has since moved to a new home in Maryland, Hains Point is worth the trip for seeing sunsets like this. Photo by Amarit Opassetthakul .

Dorchester House

The Dorchester House and the nearby Camden Roosevelt are both in that enviable area near Meridian Hill Park on 16th Street that give an enviable view of downtown just before the road dips into a downward slope. Photo by Angel Preble.

Fort Lincoln Park

The topmost points in this park in Northeast D.C. provide a unique view of the rest of the city. The park was also one of the city's ramparts used during the civil war, which makes sense as it's on a ridge. Photo by Courtney Spearman of the Cultural Landscape Foundation.

Harbour Square

This view from the Harbour Square co-op in Southwest D.C. is close to the Washington Channel and has an excellent view of the Harbour. Also, as one tipster pointed out, when the fireworks go off at nearby Nationals Stadium, there's a good view of those as well. Photo by E.L. Malvaney.

Sky House

If you're going to call the building Sky House, for Pete's sake, there had better be stunning views. This new residential building by the Waterfront definitely delivers. Not only is it possible to see those views of the National Mall and Northern Virginia from the rooftop, but during the summer it's possible to gaze out from within the building's rooftop swimming pool. Photo by Gerry Suchy.

Kennedy Row

From its spot near RFK Stadium, Kennedy Row provides a great view of the tree-covered homes of Capitol Hill and the land east of the Armory. Sunglasses are a must for this view, even if you do prefer to gaze at the city from a couch in a shadier spot. Photo by Valerie Paschall.

Capella Washington D.C.

One of D.C.'s newest hotels offers a stunning view as it's directly on the C&O Canal. What's more, guests can gaze over the canal from either the cozy rooftop lounge (shown here) or their rooftop pool.