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A statue of several soldiers holding up an American flag. The statue depicts the famous Iwo Jima landing during World War II. Shutterstock

17 military monuments, museums, and memorials in the D.C. area

Where to honor U.S. veterans and service members in and around the nation’s capital

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From the Iwo Jima Memorial to the African American Civil War Museum, the D.C. area offers numerous sites for those who wish to pay their respects to U.S. military members. Check out where you can do so in the map below.

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1. U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima)

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US Marine Memorial Cir
Arlington, VA 22209
(703) 289-2500
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This statue in Arlington, Virginia, is based on an iconic, Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph. The photo, by the Associated Press’s Joe Rosenthal, shows a group of six Marines raising an American flag in Iwo Jima, a small island 660 miles south of Tokyo, in 1945. President Dwight D. Eisenhower dedicated the 78-foot-tall memorial, in 1954, to all U.S. Marine Corps personnel who have died defending the U.S.

A statue of a group of six soldiers raising an American flag. The Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Shutterstock

2. Women In Military Service For America Memorial

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Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, VA 22211
(703) 533-1155
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At the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery, this memorial honors the women who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. In 1997, it was dedicated with a candlelight march across the Arlington Memorial Bridge, America's first all-female flyover of military aircraft, and speakers including former Vice President Al Gore.

A war memorial for women who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. It is a wide architectural structure with a rounded alcove in the middle, and is surrounded by grass. Shutterstock

3. United States Air Force Memorial

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1 Air Force Memorial Dr
Arlington, VA 22204
(703) 979-0674
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American architect James Ingo Freed designed this memorial to the U.S. Air Force in Arlington, Virginia. It was unveiled in 2006 and depicts the contrails of Air Force Thunderbirds in a “bomb burst” maneuver. The spires, which range in height from 201 feet to 270 feet, are made of stainless steel.

Three arches pointing up toward the sky. AFP/Getty Images

4. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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5 Henry Bacon Dr NW
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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The names of over 58,000 Americans who were killed or went missing during the Vietnam War are carved into this 246-foot-long memorial's black granite walls. It was designed by prominent American architect Maya Lin and debuted in 1982. Visitors regularly leave items like flowers and flags at the site.

An American flag at the base of a memorial depicting thousands of names. Shutterstock

5. Vietnam Women's Memorial

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(877) 463-3647
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Along the National Mall, this memorial was established in 1993 to honor the U.S. women who served in the Vietnam War. The structure, designed by Glenna Goodacre, shows three uniformed women with an injured soldier.

A statue of three people surrounded by trees. One of the people, a man, appears injured and is tended to by a woman. Shutterstock

6. Korean War Veterans Memorial

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10 Daniel French Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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In 1995, this memorial was dedicated to the 5.8 million Americans who served in the U.S. armed services during the Korean War. The memorial, located near the Lincoln Memorial, depicts 19 stainless steel statues wearing ponchos. They are about 7 feet tall each and surrounded by juniper bushes.

Four stainless steel statues of soldiers in a field of juniper bushes. Shutterstock

7. District of Columbia War Memorial

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1964 Independence Ave SW
Washington, D.C. 20037
(202) 426-6841
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Erected in 1931, this 47-foot-tall memorial contains 499 names of D.C. residents who lost their lives in World War I. In the memorial’s cornerstone, there is a list of the 26,000 D.C. residents who served in the war. The structure is supported by 12 Doric marble columns.

A rotunda memorial with 12 Doric columns, surrounded by trees. Shutterstock

8. Navy - Merchant Marine Memorial

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Mt Vernon Trail
Washington, D.C.

Located in Lady Bird Johnson Park on the west banks of the Potomac River, this memorial depicts seven seagulls directly above a wave. The 35-foot-tall structure, nicknamed “Waves and Gulls” and dedicated in 1934, has an inscription honoring those who served in the Navy.

A statue of seagulls and a wave, surrounded by red tulips. The Washington Monument, a tall obelisk, is in the background. Shutterstock

9. World War II Memorial

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1750 Independence Ave SW
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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This memorial on the National Mall was dedicated in 2004 for those who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II. It features 56 pillars and two triumphal arches that surround a fountain. The original “Rainbow Pool” on the site was integrated into the memorial.

An oval fountain at the center of pillars with sculptural wreaths on their faces. Getty Images

10. National Museum of American Jewish Military History

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1811 R St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 265-6280
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Founded in 1958 to document the history of Jewish Americans in the U.S. military services, this museum in Dupont Circle offers two floors of exhibitions as well as the Captain Joshua L. Goldberg Memorial Chapel.

11. African American Civil War Museum and Memorial

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1925 Vermont Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
(202) 667-2667
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This museum along the U Street NW corridor opened in 1999 to commemorate the more than 209,000 African Americans who fought for the Union during the Civil War. A memorial statue called “The Spirit of Freedom” is located directly across the street from the museum.

A statue of African-American soldiers across the street from an old school building. Christian Science Monitor/Getty

12. Old Soldiers’ Home

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140 Rock Creek Church Rd NW
Washington, DC 20011
(202) 829-0436
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This national historic landmark was built in 1851 as an “asylum for old and disabled veterans.” President Abraham Lincoln lived on site during the Civil War and ultimately spent a fourth of his presidency there. Lincoln’s Cottage opened to the public in 2008.

A two-story cottage from the Civil War era. It has sloped roof siding and a lawn. CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

13. United States Navy Memorial

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701 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20004
(202) 380-0710
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On Pennsylvania Avenue NW, this round, granite site in the style of an amphitheater features fountains, flagpole masts, and sculptural panels. The memorial was dedicated in 1987 and displays the historic achievements of the U.S. Navy. There’s also a statue of a lone sailor near the edge of the plaza.

A civic square with flagpoles on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in D.C. It is surrounded by rounded buildings. Shutterstock

14. National Guard Memorial Museum

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1 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, D.C.
(202) 789-0031
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This is the first and only national museum dedicated to the U.S. National Guard. Through artifacts and dioramas, the NoMa museum explores the National Guard’s over 375 years of history. It opened in 1976.

The entrance to the National Guard Memorial Museum, with a sign advertising the museum outside the building. Shutterstock

15. American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial

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807 Maine Ave Sw
Washington, D.C. 20024
(202) 426-6841
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In 2014, this memorial was dedicated to veterans living with permanent disabilities. The site features 48 etched glass panels with soldiers' stories as well as a reflecting pool, a star-shaped fountain, and a ceremonial flame. It also has bronze sculptures, a tree grove, and granite walls with inscriptions of presidential quotes.

A flame in the middle of water with a wall relief in the background. Shutterstock

16. Grand Army of the Republic Monument

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600 Pennylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20004

This memorial on Pennsylvania Avenue NW honors Benjamin F. Stephenson, the founder of a fraternal organization for Union veterans, known as the Grand Army of the Republic. At 25 feet high, it was dedicated in 1909 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

A 25-foot-high obelisk memorial with soldiers in the middle of Penn Quarter, D.C. There are buildings in the background. Shutterstock

17. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

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1st St NW
Washington, D.C. 20024

Completed in 1924, this memorial depicts U.S. president and Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant on a horse, surrounded by lions guarding him on shorter pedestals. The memorial also depicts artillerymen, additional horses, and seven cavalrymen, all in bronze. Sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect Edward Pearce Casey created the artwork.

A statue of Ulysses S. Grant riding a horse beneath blue skies. Shutterstock

1. U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial (Iwo Jima)

US Marine Memorial Cir, Arlington, VA 22209
A statue of a group of six soldiers raising an American flag. The Washington Monument and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Shutterstock

This statue in Arlington, Virginia, is based on an iconic, Pulitzer Prize-winning photograph. The photo, by the Associated Press’s Joe Rosenthal, shows a group of six Marines raising an American flag in Iwo Jima, a small island 660 miles south of Tokyo, in 1945. President Dwight D. Eisenhower dedicated the 78-foot-tall memorial, in 1954, to all U.S. Marine Corps personnel who have died defending the U.S.

US Marine Memorial Cir
Arlington, VA 22209

2. Women In Military Service For America Memorial

Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, VA 22211
A war memorial for women who served in the U.S. Armed Forces. It is a wide architectural structure with a rounded alcove in the middle, and is surrounded by grass. Shutterstock

At the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery, this memorial honors the women who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. In 1997, it was dedicated with a candlelight march across the Arlington Memorial Bridge, America's first all-female flyover of military aircraft, and speakers including former Vice President Al Gore.

Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington, VA 22211

3. United States Air Force Memorial

1 Air Force Memorial Dr, Arlington, VA 22204
Three arches pointing up toward the sky. AFP/Getty Images

American architect James Ingo Freed designed this memorial to the U.S. Air Force in Arlington, Virginia. It was unveiled in 2006 and depicts the contrails of Air Force Thunderbirds in a “bomb burst” maneuver. The spires, which range in height from 201 feet to 270 feet, are made of stainless steel.

1 Air Force Memorial Dr
Arlington, VA 22204

4. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

5 Henry Bacon Dr NW, Washington, D.C. 20024
An American flag at the base of a memorial depicting thousands of names. Shutterstock

The names of over 58,000 Americans who were killed or went missing during the Vietnam War are carved into this 246-foot-long memorial's black granite walls. It was designed by prominent American architect Maya Lin and debuted in 1982. Visitors regularly leave items like flowers and flags at the site.

5 Henry Bacon Dr NW
Washington, D.C. 20024

5. Vietnam Women's Memorial

Washington, D.C. 20024
A statue of three people surrounded by trees. One of the people, a man, appears injured and is tended to by a woman. Shutterstock

Along the National Mall, this memorial was established in 1993 to honor the U.S. women who served in the Vietnam War. The structure, designed by Glenna Goodacre, shows three uniformed women with an injured soldier.

6. Korean War Veterans Memorial

10 Daniel French Dr SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
Four stainless steel statues of soldiers in a field of juniper bushes. Shutterstock

In 1995, this memorial was dedicated to the 5.8 million Americans who served in the U.S. armed services during the Korean War. The memorial, located near the Lincoln Memorial, depicts 19 stainless steel statues wearing ponchos. They are about 7 feet tall each and surrounded by juniper bushes.

10 Daniel French Dr SW
Washington, D.C. 20024

7. District of Columbia War Memorial

1964 Independence Ave SW, Washington, D.C. 20037
A rotunda memorial with 12 Doric columns, surrounded by trees. Shutterstock

Erected in 1931, this 47-foot-tall memorial contains 499 names of D.C. residents who lost their lives in World War I. In the memorial’s cornerstone, there is a list of the 26,000 D.C. residents who served in the war. The structure is supported by 12 Doric marble columns.

1964 Independence Ave SW
Washington, D.C. 20037

8. Navy - Merchant Marine Memorial

Mt Vernon Trail, Washington, D.C.
A statue of seagulls and a wave, surrounded by red tulips. The Washington Monument, a tall obelisk, is in the background. Shutterstock

Located in Lady Bird Johnson Park on the west banks of the Potomac River, this memorial depicts seven seagulls directly above a wave. The 35-foot-tall structure, nicknamed “Waves and Gulls” and dedicated in 1934, has an inscription honoring those who served in the Navy.

Mt Vernon Trail
Washington, D.C.

9. World War II Memorial

1750 Independence Ave SW, Washington, D.C. 20024
An oval fountain at the center of pillars with sculptural wreaths on their faces. Getty Images

This memorial on the National Mall was dedicated in 2004 for those who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II. It features 56 pillars and two triumphal arches that surround a fountain. The original “Rainbow Pool” on the site was integrated into the memorial.

1750 Independence Ave SW
Washington, D.C. 20024

10. National Museum of American Jewish Military History

1811 R St NW, Washington, D.C. 20009

Founded in 1958 to document the history of Jewish Americans in the U.S. military services, this museum in Dupont Circle offers two floors of exhibitions as well as the Captain Joshua L. Goldberg Memorial Chapel.

1811 R St NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

11. African American Civil War Museum and Memorial

1925 Vermont Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20009
A statue of African-American soldiers across the street from an old school building. Christian Science Monitor/Getty

This museum along the U Street NW corridor opened in 1999 to commemorate the more than 209,000 African Americans who fought for the Union during the Civil War. A memorial statue called “The Spirit of Freedom” is located directly across the street from the museum.

1925 Vermont Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20009

12. Old Soldiers’ Home

140 Rock Creek Church Rd NW, Washington, DC 20011
A two-story cottage from the Civil War era. It has sloped roof siding and a lawn. CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

This national historic landmark was built in 1851 as an “asylum for old and disabled veterans.” President Abraham Lincoln lived on site during the Civil War and ultimately spent a fourth of his presidency there. Lincoln’s Cottage opened to the public in 2008.

140 Rock Creek Church Rd NW
Washington, DC 20011

13. United States Navy Memorial

701 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20004
A civic square with flagpoles on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in D.C. It is surrounded by rounded buildings. Shutterstock

On Pennsylvania Avenue NW, this round, granite site in the style of an amphitheater features fountains, flagpole masts, and sculptural panels. The memorial was dedicated in 1987 and displays the historic achievements of the U.S. Navy. There’s also a statue of a lone sailor near the edge of the plaza.

701 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20004

14. National Guard Memorial Museum

1 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, D.C.
The entrance to the National Guard Memorial Museum, with a sign advertising the museum outside the building. Shutterstock

This is the first and only national museum dedicated to the U.S. National Guard. Through artifacts and dioramas, the NoMa museum explores the National Guard’s over 375 years of history. It opened in 1976.

1 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, D.C.

15. American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial

807 Maine Ave Sw, Washington, D.C. 20024
A flame in the middle of water with a wall relief in the background. Shutterstock

In 2014, this memorial was dedicated to veterans living with permanent disabilities. The site features 48 etched glass panels with soldiers' stories as well as a reflecting pool, a star-shaped fountain, and a ceremonial flame. It also has bronze sculptures, a tree grove, and granite walls with inscriptions of presidential quotes.

807 Maine Ave Sw
Washington, D.C. 20024

16. Grand Army of the Republic Monument

600 Pennylvania Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20004
A 25-foot-high obelisk memorial with soldiers in the middle of Penn Quarter, D.C. There are buildings in the background. Shutterstock

This memorial on Pennsylvania Avenue NW honors Benjamin F. Stephenson, the founder of a fraternal organization for Union veterans, known as the Grand Army of the Republic. At 25 feet high, it was dedicated in 1909 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

600 Pennylvania Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20004

17. Ulysses S. Grant Memorial

1st St NW, Washington, D.C. 20024
A statue of Ulysses S. Grant riding a horse beneath blue skies. Shutterstock

Completed in 1924, this memorial depicts U.S. president and Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant on a horse, surrounded by lions guarding him on shorter pedestals. The memorial also depicts artillerymen, additional horses, and seven cavalrymen, all in bronze. Sculptor Henry Merwin Shrady and architect Edward Pearce Casey created the artwork.

1st St NW
Washington, D.C. 20024