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St. Aloysius Church.
St. Aloysius Church.
Photo via NCinDC

Mapping Irish churches, monuments, and memorials in D.C.

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St. Aloysius Church.
| Photo via NCinDC

Almost half of Washington, D.C.'s population in 1816 was Irish with the main wave of immigrants arriving during the Potato Famine in the late 1840s and early 1850s.

While settling into the nation's capitol, the Irish most populated three D.C. neighborhoods: Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, and Swampoodle. According to the USGen Web, the main Irish neighborhood in Washington, D.C. was below Bridge Street, now known as M Street. South of Bridge Street, Foggy Bottom contained more affordable housing and quickly became an Irish neighborhood, while some of the poorest Irishmen settled in the Swampoodle neighborhood, located near Union Station.

While Washington, D.C.'s Irish culture grew over the centuries, so too did the number of churches, monuments, and memorials constructed by or dedicated to them. From the 18th century Old St. Patrick's Church to the Embassy of Ireland, here are the 11 sites every Ireland descendant should visit.

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Holy Trinity Catholic Church

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This Catholic church was founded in 1787 and primarily served the Irish immigrants who populated the area.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Farragutful

St. Patrick Catholic Church

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Founded in 1794, St. Patrick's Church is the oldest parish in Washington, D.C. The church was built to serve the needs of the Irish immigrants who worked on the White House and the Capitol building.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

St. Aloysius Church

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Built in 1859, this Catholic Church catered to many of the Irish who lived in the Swampoodle neighborhood.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

Arsenal Memorial

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This memorial was built around 1865 to honor 19 Irish girls who were killed by an explosion at the U.S. Arsenal during the Civil War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Smallbones

Commodore John Barry Monument

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This Irish-born Naval officer is known as the Father of the American Navy. He served as an officer during the American Revolutionary War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Slowking4

Robert Emmet Statue

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Robert Emmet was an Irish Nationalist who lived from 1778 to 1865. The statue was erected in 1966 for the 50th anniversary of Ireland's independence.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

Nuns of the Battlefield Monument

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This monument was designed by Irish artist Jerome Connor. It serves as a tribute to over 600 nuns who nursed soldiers during the American Civil War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Library of Congress

James Hoban Monument

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Located in the Mount Olivet Cemetery stands the James Hoban Monument. Hoban was an Irish-born architect who commissioned many Irish to work on the construction of the White House.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Daniel Lobo

General Philip H. Sheridan Monument

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Irish-born Philip Sheridan served in the American Civil War before later becoming General of the Army, the second highest rank in the U.S. Army. The monument is located in the center of Sheridan Circle NW.
Photo via Tim Evanson

Embassy Of Ireland

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According to the Irish Embassy's website, this embassy works to promote Irish interests in the United States of America.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Loren

Basilica of the National Shrine

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The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is the largest Catholic church in the U.S., the tallest habitable building in Washington, D.C., and the eighth largest church building in the world. Inside the church, visitors will find a statue of Mary Queen of Ireland, surrounded by green marble walls with mosaic images and carvings meant to reflect the Irish heritage and Catholic faith. Behind the statue, visitors will find a Celtic cross.
A basilica seen from close-up. It has a tall set of stairs and a tower. Photo via Shutterstock/Jon Bilous

Holy Trinity Catholic Church

This Catholic church was founded in 1787 and primarily served the Irish immigrants who populated the area.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Farragutful

St. Patrick Catholic Church

Founded in 1794, St. Patrick's Church is the oldest parish in Washington, D.C. The church was built to serve the needs of the Irish immigrants who worked on the White House and the Capitol building.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

St. Aloysius Church

Built in 1859, this Catholic Church catered to many of the Irish who lived in the Swampoodle neighborhood.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

Arsenal Memorial

This memorial was built around 1865 to honor 19 Irish girls who were killed by an explosion at the U.S. Arsenal during the Civil War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Smallbones

Commodore John Barry Monument

This Irish-born Naval officer is known as the Father of the American Navy. He served as an officer during the American Revolutionary War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Slowking4

Robert Emmet Statue

Robert Emmet was an Irish Nationalist who lived from 1778 to 1865. The statue was erected in 1966 for the 50th anniversary of Ireland's independence.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

Nuns of the Battlefield Monument

This monument was designed by Irish artist Jerome Connor. It serves as a tribute to over 600 nuns who nursed soldiers during the American Civil War.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Library of Congress

James Hoban Monument

Located in the Mount Olivet Cemetery stands the James Hoban Monument. Hoban was an Irish-born architect who commissioned many Irish to work on the construction of the White House.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Daniel Lobo

General Philip H. Sheridan Monument

Irish-born Philip Sheridan served in the American Civil War before later becoming General of the Army, the second highest rank in the U.S. Army. The monument is located in the center of Sheridan Circle NW.
Photo via Tim Evanson

Embassy Of Ireland

According to the Irish Embassy's website, this embassy works to promote Irish interests in the United States of America.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Loren

Basilica of the National Shrine

The Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is the largest Catholic church in the U.S., the tallest habitable building in Washington, D.C., and the eighth largest church building in the world. Inside the church, visitors will find a statue of Mary Queen of Ireland, surrounded by green marble walls with mosaic images and carvings meant to reflect the Irish heritage and Catholic faith. Behind the statue, visitors will find a Celtic cross.
A basilica seen from close-up. It has a tall set of stairs and a tower. Photo via Shutterstock/Jon Bilous