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A Map Of D.C.'s Eight Most Architecturally Exciting Embassies

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When discussing the interesting architecture of our nation's capital, it's hard not to look at the buildings owned by foreign governments. Embassy Row has a wealth of gorgeous buildings that are often bright, regal and unique. However, some Embassies are more likely to strike awe into hearts than others, so in order to make sure that you're catching glimpses the best ones on your next architectural walking tour, here are our top eight picks for most architecturally exciting embassies. Do you think that we've left off a clearly superior Embassy headquarters? Do you think that we included a building that deserves more in-depth coverage? The tipline is always open to suggestions and comments.


· List of Diplomatic Missions in Washington, D.C. [Wikipedia]

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1. Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil

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3006 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008
(202) 238-2805

This super modern glass building structure was actually one of the first on Embassy Row and it remains one of the most striking. Brazilian architect Olavo Redig de Campos designed it and it even made a brief appearance in the movie D.C. Cab. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC

2. Embassy of Estonia

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2131 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

This neoclassical Embassy Row house is so pretty, it's been an embassy twice! Prior to Estonia's purchase of the building in 1994, it had been the Embassy of Peru. Photo by Flickr user Meghan.

3. Embassy Of Guyana

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2490 Tracy Pl NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
(202) 265-6900

Guyana is a country on the northern coast of South America but the facade of this Kalorama home is more reminiscent of a Swiss ski lodge. Photo used under Creative Commons.

4. Embassy of Cameroon

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2349 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

This is almost unfair to use, because the Embassy of Cameroon has temporarily relocated to 1700 Wisconsin Avenue. However, the Christian Hauge House, originally built for a Norwegian diplomat, is one of the most regal buildings in already-impressive Georgetown. Photo by Florence Craye.

5. Embassy of Kazakhstan

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1401 16th Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

For a home that was built in 1888, this brick Richardsonian style embassy looks incredibly modern (minus the telltale corner tower). Before being an embassy, it actually housed a Vice President. Also, the doorway is rather intense. Photo by Adam Fagen.

6. Embassy of Mozambique

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1525 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

Say what you will about painted brick, but sometimes it's striking for all the right reasons. Such is the case with this yellow and brown rowhouse in Dupont. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

7. Embassy of Namibia

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1605 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20009

African Embassies are ruling on this list! This delightful bright red home also has a beautifully detailed facade right above the front door. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

8. Embassy of Senegal/Embassy of Moldova/Embassy of Albania

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2031 Florida Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20001

It's not as stunning as the ivy-covered building in Kalorama that housed the Senegal headquarters previously, but this gorgeous rounded townhouse building that houses the Embassies of Moldova, Senegal AND Albania also has interesting frieze details near the roof. Photo by Ron Cogswell

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1. Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil

3006 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20008

This super modern glass building structure was actually one of the first on Embassy Row and it remains one of the most striking. Brazilian architect Olavo Redig de Campos designed it and it even made a brief appearance in the movie D.C. Cab. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC

3006 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

2. Embassy of Estonia

2131 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20008

This neoclassical Embassy Row house is so pretty, it's been an embassy twice! Prior to Estonia's purchase of the building in 1994, it had been the Embassy of Peru. Photo by Flickr user Meghan.

2131 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

3. Embassy Of Guyana

2490 Tracy Pl NW, Washington, D.C. 20008

Guyana is a country on the northern coast of South America but the facade of this Kalorama home is more reminiscent of a Swiss ski lodge. Photo used under Creative Commons.

2490 Tracy Pl NW
Washington, D.C. 20008

4. Embassy of Cameroon

2349 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20008

This is almost unfair to use, because the Embassy of Cameroon has temporarily relocated to 1700 Wisconsin Avenue. However, the Christian Hauge House, originally built for a Norwegian diplomat, is one of the most regal buildings in already-impressive Georgetown. Photo by Florence Craye.

2349 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20008

5. Embassy of Kazakhstan

1401 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC 20036

For a home that was built in 1888, this brick Richardsonian style embassy looks incredibly modern (minus the telltale corner tower). Before being an embassy, it actually housed a Vice President. Also, the doorway is rather intense. Photo by Adam Fagen.

1401 16th Street Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

6. Embassy of Mozambique

1525 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20036

Say what you will about painted brick, but sometimes it's striking for all the right reasons. Such is the case with this yellow and brown rowhouse in Dupont. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

1525 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20036

7. Embassy of Namibia

1605 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20009

African Embassies are ruling on this list! This delightful bright red home also has a beautifully detailed facade right above the front door. Photo by Flickr user NCinDC.

1605 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20009

8. Embassy of Senegal/Embassy of Moldova/Embassy of Albania

2031 Florida Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20001

It's not as stunning as the ivy-covered building in Kalorama that housed the Senegal headquarters previously, but this gorgeous rounded townhouse building that houses the Embassies of Moldova, Senegal AND Albania also has interesting frieze details near the roof. Photo by Ron Cogswell

2031 Florida Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20001