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Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Photo via wolfpackWX

8 notable D.C. buildings and spaces designed by female architects

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Vietnam Veterans Memorial
| Photo via wolfpackWX

While the field of architecture is a primarily male-driven industry, that doesn't mean women aren't all around us, playing an important role in the field. In Washington, D.C., there are a myriad of notable projects designed by women, including the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and Dupont Underground's redevelopment.

In honor of International Women’s Day, Curbed put together eight of these projects. Below, listed in no particular order, see some of Washington, D.C.'s best designed memorials, headquarters, schools, gardens, and museums—each one designed by a female architect.

Were there any projects left off? Let Curbed know by leaving a comment or emailing the tipline.

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1. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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5 Henry Bacon Dr NW
Washington, D.C. 20024
First on the list is one of Washington, D.C.'s most notable memorials, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, designed by Maya Lin. At the age of 21 in the year 1981, Lin was able to win the public design competition for the memorial, beating over 1,440 proposals. Dedicated on November 13, 1982, the structure features 57,661 names of fallen soldiers carved into a cut-stone masonry wall.
Photo via Howard Ignatius

2. NPR News Headquarters

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1111 N Capitol St NE
Washington, D.C. 20002
Yolanda Cole, the Senior Principal and owner of Washington, D.C.-based firm Hickok Cole Architects, designed the LEED Gold-certified NPR headquarteres in 2013. After the 330,000-square-foot, build-to-suit structure was completed, it won multiple awards. In an interview with Curbed DC, Cole said that out of all of the projects she's worked on the NPR headquarters is her "all-time favorite" because she was such a long-time fan of the organization.
Photo via Hickok Cole Architects/Adrian Wilson

3. Hine Junior High School

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7th St SE
Washington, D.C. 20003
The lead planner and design architect of the renovation of Capitol Hill's Hine Junior High School is none other than Principal of Weinstein Studio Amy Weinstein. Weinstein has won over 30 design awards and been published in architectural journals around the world. The plan for the Hine Junior High School project is to create a LEED-designed, mixed-use development with 158 residential units, boutiques, and restaurants. There will also be underground parking and a spot for a flea market. The project is expected to deliver mid-2017.
Rendering via Board of Zoning Adjustment documents

4. Bailey Park

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625 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20001
Suzane Reatig is an architect already known for transforming Shaw through design. This award-winning project, though, is one of her most notable developments, called Bailey Park. It offers oversize rental flats and duplexes with open floor plans, high ceilings, and private balconies and terraces. There are a total of 16 residential units in the LEED-certified, pet-friendly project.
Photo via Alan Karchmer Photography/Suzane Reatig

5. John and Jill Ker Conway Residence

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1005 North Capitol St NE
Washington, DC 20002
This 14-story, residential project is an example of how permanent supportive housing doesn't have to look gloomy. The architecturally stunning property was designed by Suman Sorg, founder of Sorg Architects. It opened in January 2017 with 124 units, 64 of which will be for homeless veterans and 60 of which will be for those who make no more than 60 percent of the area median income.
Rendering via Sorg Architects

6. National Building Museum

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401 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20001
The National Building Museum is the nation's premier cultural institution dedicated to exploring and celebrating architecture, design, engineering, and construction. With its 75-foot-tall Corinthian columns and 1,200-foot terra cotta frieze, the museum first opened in the Pension Building in 1980. The museum wouldn't have been possible, though, if it wasn't for architect Chloethiel Woodard Smith. It was because of her report in 1967 that Congress decided the Pension Building was the right place for the project. Smith is also known as one of the first women to become well known in American architecture and one of the most influential builders of D.C. after World War I.
Photo via Phil Roeder

7. Dupont Underground

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1 Dupont Circle
Washington, D.C.
While not solely owned by a woman or women, it's because of Hunt Laudi Studio that the Arts Coalition for Dupont Underground was established. This non-profit seeks to reopen the subterranean trolley station underneath Dupont Circle, known as Dupont Underground, as an arts and retail space. The founders of the architectural firm include female architects Lucrecia Laudi and Monling Lee as well as male architect Julian Hunt.
Photo of "Raise/Raze" exhibit via Dupont Underground

8. Dumbarton Oaks Gardens

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1703 32nd St NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
(202) 339-6409
Visit Website
In her lifetime, Beatrix Farrand designed over 100 gardens, including The White House's East Colonial Garden and the West Garden. One of her most notable projects was designing a series of terraced gardens and more at Dumbarton Oaks, a historic Georgetown estate founded in 1940. For almost 30 years, Farrand maintained the garden landscape, that included a middle zone of pools, tennis court, and orchards.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

1. Vietnam Veterans Memorial

5 Henry Bacon Dr NW, Washington, D.C. 20024
Photo via Howard Ignatius
First on the list is one of Washington, D.C.'s most notable memorials, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, designed by Maya Lin. At the age of 21 in the year 1981, Lin was able to win the public design competition for the memorial, beating over 1,440 proposals. Dedicated on November 13, 1982, the structure features 57,661 names of fallen soldiers carved into a cut-stone masonry wall.
5 Henry Bacon Dr NW
Washington, D.C. 20024

2. NPR News Headquarters

1111 N Capitol St NE, Washington, D.C. 20002
Photo via Hickok Cole Architects/Adrian Wilson
Yolanda Cole, the Senior Principal and owner of Washington, D.C.-based firm Hickok Cole Architects, designed the LEED Gold-certified NPR headquarteres in 2013. After the 330,000-square-foot, build-to-suit structure was completed, it won multiple awards. In an interview with Curbed DC, Cole said that out of all of the projects she's worked on the NPR headquarters is her "all-time favorite" because she was such a long-time fan of the organization.
1111 N Capitol St NE
Washington, D.C. 20002

3. Hine Junior High School

7th St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003
Rendering via Board of Zoning Adjustment documents
The lead planner and design architect of the renovation of Capitol Hill's Hine Junior High School is none other than Principal of Weinstein Studio Amy Weinstein. Weinstein has won over 30 design awards and been published in architectural journals around the world. The plan for the Hine Junior High School project is to create a LEED-designed, mixed-use development with 158 residential units, boutiques, and restaurants. There will also be underground parking and a spot for a flea market. The project is expected to deliver mid-2017.
7th St SE
Washington, D.C. 20003

4. Bailey Park

625 Rhode Island Ave NW, Washington, D.C. 20001
Photo via Alan Karchmer Photography/Suzane Reatig
Suzane Reatig is an architect already known for transforming Shaw through design. This award-winning project, though, is one of her most notable developments, called Bailey Park. It offers oversize rental flats and duplexes with open floor plans, high ceilings, and private balconies and terraces. There are a total of 16 residential units in the LEED-certified, pet-friendly project.
625 Rhode Island Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20001

5. John and Jill Ker Conway Residence

1005 North Capitol St NE, Washington, DC 20002
Rendering via Sorg Architects
This 14-story, residential project is an example of how permanent supportive housing doesn't have to look gloomy. The architecturally stunning property was designed by Suman Sorg, founder of Sorg Architects. It opened in January 2017 with 124 units, 64 of which will be for homeless veterans and 60 of which will be for those who make no more than 60 percent of the area median income.
1005 North Capitol St NE
Washington, DC 20002

6. National Building Museum

401 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20001
Photo via Phil Roeder
The National Building Museum is the nation's premier cultural institution dedicated to exploring and celebrating architecture, design, engineering, and construction. With its 75-foot-tall Corinthian columns and 1,200-foot terra cotta frieze, the museum first opened in the Pension Building in 1980. The museum wouldn't have been possible, though, if it wasn't for architect Chloethiel Woodard Smith. It was because of her report in 1967 that Congress decided the Pension Building was the right place for the project. Smith is also known as one of the first women to become well known in American architecture and one of the most influential builders of D.C. after World War I.
401 F St NW
Washington, D.C. 20001

7. Dupont Underground

1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C.
Photo of "Raise/Raze" exhibit via Dupont Underground
While not solely owned by a woman or women, it's because of Hunt Laudi Studio that the Arts Coalition for Dupont Underground was established. This non-profit seeks to reopen the subterranean trolley station underneath Dupont Circle, known as Dupont Underground, as an arts and retail space. The founders of the architectural firm include female architects Lucrecia Laudi and Monling Lee as well as male architect Julian Hunt.
1 Dupont Circle
Washington, D.C.

8. Dumbarton Oaks Gardens

1703 32nd St NW, Washington, D.C. 20007
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid
In her lifetime, Beatrix Farrand designed over 100 gardens, including The White House's East Colonial Garden and the West Garden. One of her most notable projects was designing a series of terraced gardens and more at Dumbarton Oaks, a historic Georgetown estate founded in 1940. For almost 30 years, Farrand maintained the garden landscape, that included a middle zone of pools, tennis court, and orchards.
1703 32nd St NW
Washington, D.C. 20007