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Wonder Bread Factory.
Wonder Bread Factory.
Photo via Douglas Development

Mapping D.C.'s converted warehouses, factories, and other industrial buildings

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Wonder Bread Factory.
| Photo via Douglas Development

Everything from churches to schools have been converted in Washington, D.C. There aren't too many converted factories or warehouses, though, which shouldn't be any wonder since the District is primarily focused on government work as opposed to heavy or light industry.

Despite this, there's still enough to map. Below, check out which industrial buildings in D.C. have been converted into housing, retail, and offices.

Are there any buildings mistakenly left off this list? Let Curbed DC know in the comments.

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Delancey Lofts

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This 1930s-built Adams Morgan warehouse was converted into a condo building in 2005. Ever since, it's offered 48 modern condos across four floors. Prices range from $350,000 to $750,000. Inside, there are double height ceilings, exposed brick, and stainless steel appliances.
Photo via Compass

The Helicopter Factory

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At one point, this factory created the world's earliest helicopters. In 2016, Washington, D.C.-based Brick Lane and Brook Rose Development combined three original historic warehouses into one building, creating this condo development. Six industrial-style row houses with 13 units were also constructed on what was a surface parking lot.
Photo via Brick Lane

The Flats at Union Row

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PN Hoffman converted old commercial warehouses in U Street Corridor into 59 townhomes and 216 condos. Creating The Flats at Union Row, there is a hybrid look of a retro factory with a modern glass and brick architecture. Prices range from $270,000 to a little over $1 million. Here, there are private terraces, curved walls, and amenities like garage parking and a 24-hour front desk and security. This development was constructed in 2007.
Photo via Google Street View

Wonder Bread Factory

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As can be assumed from the title of this building, this development was once a factory for Wonder Bread from the early 1900s until the 1980s. For almost 20 years, the building sat vacant. Douglas Development later converted the historic building in 2013 into a four-story Class A office development with 27 below-grade parking spaces.
Photo via Douglas Development

Yale West

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This structure was constructed in Mt. Vernon Triangle in c. 1902. At the time, it served as a laundry facility. Now, it consists of 16 condos with a new 12-story tower with an additional 132 units. Here, amenities include a rooftop pool, fitness center, and garage parking. The developer behind the project was Scott Fuller. The conversion was completed in 2008.
PHoto via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid
In 2016, Douglas Development converted the historic Uline Arena building into a La Colombe coffee shop and the fifth ever REI flagship store. Inside, the 51,000-square-foot, LEED Gold-certified building houses a courtyard and 30 percent more product than a typical REI store. It also utilizes reclaimed wood and steel as well as the original flooring of the building. Uline Arena was also known as the Washington Coliseum. It once hosted events that included ice skating, circuses, and The Beatles’ first ever U.S. concert. The former industrial use of this building was that it was once a trash transfer station.
Photo by Michelle Goldchain

Foundry Lofts

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In one of Navy Yard's naval factories, the Foundry Lofts boasts a myriad of amenities, including a courtyard, fitness center, and sculpture terrace with an outdoor fireplace. Constructed in 1918, this development was once known as Building 160 and the Pattern/Joiner shop. Forest City Washington redeveloped the building in 2011.
Photo via Google Street View

Republic Restoratives

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In Ivy City, this factory was totally refurbished by Mapos, an architecture and interiors firm based in New York. Now, it is a women-owned and -run whiskey distillery.
Photo courtesy of Mapos

The Hecht Warehouse at Ivy City

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Douglas Development totally redeveloped this previously vacant warehouse in 2015. The c. 1937-constructed building now houses 335 residential units, ranging from studios to three-bedrooms. Amenities inside the project include a "dog run," fitness center, and on-site grocery store.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Superbass

Torpedo Factory Art Center

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Starting 1918, this Alexandria, Virginia building served as a torpedo factory. By June 1945, activity in the factory came to a halt. It wasn't until May 1974 when work began on the building to convert it into art galleries and studios. Finally, in September 1974, the building reopened to the public, this time as an arts space. There are over 165 professional artists who work at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center. Over half a million visitors come to this venue every year.
Photo via Cliff

Delancey Lofts

Photo via Compass
This 1930s-built Adams Morgan warehouse was converted into a condo building in 2005. Ever since, it's offered 48 modern condos across four floors. Prices range from $350,000 to $750,000. Inside, there are double height ceilings, exposed brick, and stainless steel appliances.
Photo via Compass

The Helicopter Factory

Photo via Brick Lane
At one point, this factory created the world's earliest helicopters. In 2016, Washington, D.C.-based Brick Lane and Brook Rose Development combined three original historic warehouses into one building, creating this condo development. Six industrial-style row houses with 13 units were also constructed on what was a surface parking lot.
Photo via Brick Lane

The Flats at Union Row

Photo via Google Street View
PN Hoffman converted old commercial warehouses in U Street Corridor into 59 townhomes and 216 condos. Creating The Flats at Union Row, there is a hybrid look of a retro factory with a modern glass and brick architecture. Prices range from $270,000 to a little over $1 million. Here, there are private terraces, curved walls, and amenities like garage parking and a 24-hour front desk and security. This development was constructed in 2007.
Photo via Google Street View

Wonder Bread Factory

Photo via Douglas Development
As can be assumed from the title of this building, this development was once a factory for Wonder Bread from the early 1900s until the 1980s. For almost 20 years, the building sat vacant. Douglas Development later converted the historic building in 2013 into a four-story Class A office development with 27 below-grade parking spaces.
Photo via Douglas Development

Yale West

PHoto via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid
This structure was constructed in Mt. Vernon Triangle in c. 1902. At the time, it served as a laundry facility. Now, it consists of 16 condos with a new 12-story tower with an additional 132 units. Here, amenities include a rooftop pool, fitness center, and garage parking. The developer behind the project was Scott Fuller. The conversion was completed in 2008.
PHoto via Wikimedia Commons/AgnosticPreachersKid

REI

Photo by Michelle Goldchain
In 2016, Douglas Development converted the historic Uline Arena building into a La Colombe coffee shop and the fifth ever REI flagship store. Inside, the 51,000-square-foot, LEED Gold-certified building houses a courtyard and 30 percent more product than a typical REI store. It also utilizes reclaimed wood and steel as well as the original flooring of the building. Uline Arena was also known as the Washington Coliseum. It once hosted events that included ice skating, circuses, and The Beatles’ first ever U.S. concert. The former industrial use of this building was that it was once a trash transfer station.
Photo by Michelle Goldchain

Foundry Lofts

Photo via Google Street View
In one of Navy Yard's naval factories, the Foundry Lofts boasts a myriad of amenities, including a courtyard, fitness center, and sculpture terrace with an outdoor fireplace. Constructed in 1918, this development was once known as Building 160 and the Pattern/Joiner shop. Forest City Washington redeveloped the building in 2011.
Photo via Google Street View

Republic Restoratives

Photo courtesy of Mapos
In Ivy City, this factory was totally refurbished by Mapos, an architecture and interiors firm based in New York. Now, it is a women-owned and -run whiskey distillery.
Photo courtesy of Mapos

The Hecht Warehouse at Ivy City

Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Superbass
Douglas Development totally redeveloped this previously vacant warehouse in 2015. The c. 1937-constructed building now houses 335 residential units, ranging from studios to three-bedrooms. Amenities inside the project include a "dog run," fitness center, and on-site grocery store.
Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Superbass

Torpedo Factory Art Center

Photo via Cliff
Starting 1918, this Alexandria, Virginia building served as a torpedo factory. By June 1945, activity in the factory came to a halt. It wasn't until May 1974 when work began on the building to convert it into art galleries and studios. Finally, in September 1974, the building reopened to the public, this time as an arts space. There are over 165 professional artists who work at the Torpedo Factory Arts Center. Over half a million visitors come to this venue every year.
Photo via Cliff