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D.C. needs 35 percent yearly reduction in traffic-related deaths, fatalities to achieve Vision Zero by 2024

A new fatality task force will launch with the goal to investigate every fatal crash

Photo via Anne Roth

In 2016, there were 439 people seriously injured in crashes on Washington, D.C.’s roads. That same year, Mayor Muriel Bowser began an action plan, known as Vision Zero, that hopes to eliminate all fatalities and serious injuries to pedestrians and cyclists from drivers by the year 2024.

Recently, Bowser released a 66-page report that details the 25 offices and departments tasked with this goal. According to WAMU, it also sets the foundation for the projects and policies for the next decade.

According to the report, all fatalities and serious injuries will have to reduce by 35 percent each year through 2024.

Image via 2016 Vision Zero Progress Report

From 2015 to 2016, the number of fatalities increased from 26 to 28, while the number of pedestrians killed dropped from 15 to 9. Crash injuries increased from 12,122 to 12,430.

In order to improve D.C.’s streets, the District installed seven HAWK signals, filled in 22 blocks of sidewalk gaps, and added five new traffic signals at “high-crash” intersections.

This year, a new fatality task force will also launch with the goal to investigate every fatal crash. This task force will work with the Metropolitan Police Department, DDOT, and other public stakeholders.

Image via 2016 Vision Zero Progress Report

In order to create more awareness of Vision Zero, D.C.-based architecture firm Marshall Moya Design created “The Walkway” in January 2017. The 32-foot-long, 11-foot-wide, nine-foot-tall walkway offered graphics as well as city sounds and conversations that transitioned from “harmless to threatening and back to harmless exchanges,” according to a fact sheet on “The Walkway.”

Interested in giving Bowser’s new report a look? Check it out below.

How Is D.C. Doing One Year Into ‘Vision Zero’ Plan To Eliminate Roadway Fatalities? [WAMU]