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Before and after NoMa’s transformation

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In roughly 10 years, new developments have revitalized a neighborhood that was once desolate

Washington, D.C.'s Northeast neighborhood, NoMa, didn't truly start forming its identity as a hip and bustling area until the last few years, and the below photos prove this.

Before the late 1990s, the neighborhood, which is an acronym of "North of Massachusetts Avenue," was known more for its Greyhound station and vacant plots of land. Now, it features a Harris Teeter, Union Market, and 18 blocks of free outdoor Wi-Fi.

In order to illustrate just how rapid NoMa's growth has been, Curbed searched through Google Street View to find the best before-and-after examples of street corners that were once empty. These photos stem all the way back to 2007 with the newest photos from 2015.

For more before-and-after sliders of Washington, D.C., check out this Curbed DC article, exploring what 11 spots in the city look like today.

N and First streets NE

Photos taken: November 2007 and May 2014

100_Florida_Ave_NE

Photos taken: July 2009 and September 2015

1201 First St NE

Photos taken: June 2008 and August 2014

L and Second streets NE

Photos taken: November 2007 and August 2014

K and First streets NE

Photos taken: November 2007 and August 2014

151 Q St NE

Photos taken: November 2007 and August 2014